Wilhelmsen launches early adopter program for 3D printed spare parts

Wilhelmsen launches early adopter program for 3D printed spare parts

Carnival Maritime, Thome Ship Management, OSM Maritime Group, Berge Bulk, Executive Ship Management and Wilhelmsen Ship Management have signed up to Wilhelmsen’s 3DP printing early adopter program (EAP) to begin utilising on-demand additive manufacturing.

Wilhelmsen’s new 3D printing program, which was recently launched in Singapore, is part of an ongoing cooperation with with Ivaldi Group to provide spare parts on demand to the selected six customers’ vessels around the globe. Through a unique digitisation and certification process, parts will be produced on-demand, without having to go through time consuming and costly storage, shipping, customs and receiving processes.

“The savings from reduced cost, time and environmental footprint provided by 3D printing, digital inventory and on-demand localised manufacturing of maritime spare parts is a tremendous opportunity for our valued subscribers to be ahead of their rivals,” said Hakon Ellekjaer, head of venture, 3D Printing, Wilhelmsen.

“We believe on-demand manufacturing technologies are going to completely reshape the maritime supply chain.”

Carnival Maritime’s head of innovation and energy management, Sebastian Sala, commented: “Carnival operates over 100 cruise ships with various itineraries worldwide. Adding 3D printed parts with fast delivery to our portfolio, will be the first steps towards an exciting future for global logistics in the cruise industry.”

Ashish Malik, Deputy COO, Thome Ship Management, explained: “Thome Group is committed to promoting and adopting innovative technologies that can enhance not only the operational efficiency of ships, but also management of the assets. We have observed that 3D printing or on-demand additive manufacturing has the potential to become an alternative solution that can offer an easier, faster, economic and more environment friendly alternative to the conventional marine supply chain. Besides looking at the technology as a means for manufacturing items that are not available readily from regular sources, through our partnership with Wilhelmsen Ships Service and Ivaldi Group, we are actively exploring the option of using this solution for establishing a structured supply chain for certain regular stores and spare parts.”

Of the six companies in the EAP, both Wilhelmsen Ship Management and Berge Bulk have been using 3D Printing for over a year, acting as the beta testers for the system, ahead of the official launch of the EAP.

“We see great potential with usage of 3D printed spare parts. Wilhelmsen Ships Service and Ivaldi Group are providing cutting edge technology that will greatly benefit our customers – a highly efficient, cost effective and environmentally friendly way of providing spare parts. We are excited about this opportunity,” said Capt. Patwardhan J, general manager, Wilhelmsen Ship Management Singapore.

Wilhelmsen has started with smaller polymer and metal parts in the comfort critical category. Spare parts are 3D printed and delivered within hours to vessels who subscribe to the company’s services. Such on-demand localised manufacturing results in a substantially lower carbon footprint compared to traditional supply chains and logistics.

Benefits also include reduced lead times, enhanced availability of parts, simplified procurement process, reduced inventory and transportation costs. Additional cost savings include decreased port fees by cutting maintenance delays and increasing the service life of existing equipment.

This article was first published on Digital Ship.